ClearVin Review

In a Nutshell

ClearVin is a supplier of car history reports which is partnered with the National Motor Vehicle Titling Information System (NMVTIS) and U.S. Department of Justice to bring trusted information to used car buyers. ClearVin reports include repair and robbery records. The system also detects ownership, changes in title, and insurance information. ClearVin operates with government agencies to guarantee that every car on the highway shares the most precise information. At first glance, ClearVin is a competitive car VIN decoder compared by its price, reliability, and the load of generating car history data. However, to form a better opinion, you need to get into details. So let’s get down to the ClearVin review.

Pros

  • Offers an easy and convenient history of trucks
  • A free recalls look-up system
  • Money-back guarantee
  • Informative website

Cons

  • Has less data than major competitors
  • ClearVin’s site may be slow at times
  • The information provided on their website might not always be up to date

Database Model

What’s so different about ClearVin is that it has extensive information sources that use a range of government and public records to provide you with a clear and accessible history. This is held as an important factor for a VIN check system. ClearVin draws information from a number of non-listed extra sources, like financial institutions, federal agencies, and local departments. Extensive partnerships across the automotive industry provide distinctive data to ClearVin clients that make their reports reliable.

Factors

What you get from a ClearVin report:

  • Title Brand Information

One of ClearVin’s most significant parts of data is the car branding data, as recorded every moment the car was registered. This will not only let you know if the vehicle has a junk, salvage or rescue title, it can also provide useful insight into what kinds of particular harm the vehicle has suffered, such as flood or fire damage, whether it was a taxi or police car and many other.

  • Insurance records

If an insurance company has written off the car as a “Total Loss,” this chapter will inform you when this has occurred and which firm has appointed the vehicle as a complete loss. It will also provide contact data to the business, if available.

  • Vehicle Value Information

Before bidding on it, it is essential to know the potential value of a vehicle to ensure that you do not overpay for something without realizing it. Your report’s Vehicle Value Information section will provide the value of retail and trading as well as the prospective credit value that you might expect.

  • Ownership costs

Ownership costs data allows you to evaluate factors that can affect the price of a buying car. It is mostly related to the projections of car maintenance, but these factors can also include probable depreciation, insurance costs, and other variables.

  • Recalls

If a car was in a recall, the report would contain the data that you need to verify whether the repair was performed for that particular vehicle. This is the type of information you cannot receive verbally, i. e. from the seller.

  • Features

Reports from ClearVin are filled with information, from basic data, such as where a vehicle was built to its historic retail value. The platform gets into details such as data about junk and salvage. Insurance, odometer, title documents, and history of sales round out the report. Even pictures and information from previous accidents may be included in reports.

Pricing and Deals

For individuals: 1 report - $14.99 3 reports - $29.98 5 reports - $39.99

For dealers: 20 reports - $60 40 reports - $100 100 reports - $220

How do you compare ClearVin?

ClearVin is a potential way to get a report about a car you’re looking at. It will provide you with much of the same data you would discover on a report from other well-known VIN check websites, but at a fairly lower price. Within its FAQ section, ClearVin states that it doesn’t demonstrate repair and collision data about cars that are deemed a complete loss. This is because these cars are usually taken off the highway and never driven again. However, if someone buys it and fixes it, that car will have a permanent rescue name, which is something ClearVIN would indicate to you.

Customer Support

Contact ClearVin for any question concerning any vehicle’s VIN number check. Call + 1 (844) 268-5991 or send an email to info@clearvin.com. Their business hours Monday-Friday from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, so you can expect quite a decent customer support. You can also locate ClearVin on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ or read their blog, so all this only adds engagement. However, Google+ is no longer available for brand accounts since April 2019, so the information provided on their website might not always be up to date.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the ClearVin Dealer Program?
  • How much does it cost to participate in the Dealer Program?
  • Do I have to be a car dealer to sign-up?
  • How can I join?
  • How do I run reports?
  • What is the difference between Dealer Program reports and those available to the public?
  • How do I share, store and manage my reports?
  • What is a NMVTIS-compliant report?
  • How do I cancel my account?

ClearVin is dedicated to offering information on car background. It offers precise data from credible sources as their primary focus. The reports include almost all vital records, so you should be able to get what you’re looking for. In addition to Accident History and Salvage & Total Loss occurrences, ClearVin records provide car specifications presented by insurance firms. Reports also provide Title History information, Retail, Trade-in and Loan Values, Recall History and any exceptional and previous links to the car. ClearVin reports aggregate data to create transparency and help you clear the entire background of your chosen vehicle.

On the other hand, we noticed some evidence that the site of ClearVin is not being looked after properly. For example, the copyright notice at the bottom of the page marks the year of 2018. This can indicate that some of the information provided on the website might be outdated, which may lead to confusion afterward.